MOST GASE X ECCT LCI Green in Tech

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Climate change is an inevitable and urgent global issue. Going green to reduce carbon footprint is of concern to everyone. Green in Tech: Talent Development for Sustainable Technology, co-organized by MOST GASE (MOST Center for Global Affairs and Science Engagement) and ECCT LCI (European Chamber of Commerce Taiwan Low Carbon Initiative), invited senior executives from four iconic enterprises involved in renewable energy to share their academic and career journeys, in the hopes of inspiring more young people to pursue a career in the related fields.

The green electricity and renewable energy industries is one of the six core strategic industries. To align with the global goal of net-zero emissions by 2050, this event, held physically and online simultaneously, featured a panel discussion on the emerging field of renewable energy and attracted more than 200 young people and students to join and raise their questions. Hsiao-Wei Yuan, VP for International Affairs of NTU and Director of MOST GASE, was the moderator and conducted a brilliant conversation with the panelists, including; Mr. Bart Linssen (Managing Director of ENERCON Taiwan), Mr. Jay Mao (Chairman of Michelin Tire Taiwan), Ms. Jennifer Wang (Managing Director of TÜV Rheinland), and Mr. Andy Wu (Chargé de Mission of Air Liquide Far Eastern), which inspired audience members.

Mr. Linssen mentioned a class in college where he was left with a strong impression of climate change and global warming. After settling down in Taiwan, he was playing with his daughter at the beach one day when he came across some wind turbines and decided to apply for a job at the wind developer in the spur of the moment. Whilst there were no vacancies then at the developer, he was introduced to the manufacturing headquarters - ENERCON. Mr. Linssen said, “You never know when the opportunity comes, so you must grasp every opportunity.” Although he has faced many challenges in the process of promoting green energy and installing wind turbines, he still has a great passion for his job. He encouraged the audience to stay passionate about their work and figure out what they are fighting for.

Mr. Mao said, “Michelin is a tyre manufacturing company. Our core business is producing tyres. We have always contributed to progress in the mobility of people.” He has been at Michelin for thirty years, working across many departments from back-end logistics to front-end sales. He reminded the audience that working environments are changing at a fast pace, only continuous learning can allow us to adapt to dynamic changes in the workplace.

Ms. Wang indicated that Taiwan announced the target of reaching net zero by 2050 and Apple had also declared the aim of creating a net-zero supply chain by 2030. To catch up with this trend, many suppliers in Taiwan have to make a prompt shift towards sustainability. Therefore, new graduates may wish to seek job opportunities in green energy related fields. Additionally, Ms. Wang mentioned that students should face their own weaknesses and try their best to overcome them. Since she was a child, she has not been good at expressing herself. To improve her communication skills, she not only read the book, 銀座媽媽桑的說話術, but also carried out a part-time job as a salesperson at a telecom company.

Mr. Wu believes that a lot of future careers still have yet to be created. Just like ten years ago, no one could have imagined there would be a career such as a “Youtuber”. Therefore, young people should hold on to every chance they get and learn from every single job.  

Not only dedicated to talent development in Taiwan and worldwide, MOST GASE also takes the initiative to support the youth in collaborations with industry, government, academy and research institutions. This event is one of Haido Series for talent development, an extension of Women in Tech. In pursuit of the essence of gender equality, this event did not emphasize females’ status, and instead promoted gender equality and diverse developments in Taiwan’s R&D industry.
 

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